Eric L. Moore, Ph.D., CCDC Chemical Biological Center Director

Eric L. Moore, Ph.D., is the director of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC) Chemical Biological Center, the only chemical and biological defense technology center of its kind. He is a member of the Senior Executive Service and is an expert in chemical and biological defense and medical countermeasures.
Prior to his selection as Center director in October 2017, Moore served in various roles at the Defense Threat Reduction Agency including chief of the Advanced and Emerging Threat Division, chief of the Basic and Supporting Sciences Division and senior science and technology manager for chemical medical countermeasures. (Photo by CCDC Chemcial Biological Center)

Director’s Message: Past, Future Accomplishments Start with People

Director’s Message: Past, Future Accomplishments Start with People

By Eric L. Moore, Ph.D., CCDC Chemical Biological Center Director

With the start of a new calendar year, it’s natural that we reflect on our accomplishments and look forward to the challenges that lie ahead. It’s been a year of changes and accomplishments at the CCDC Chemical Biological Center, and you’ll find articles featuring some of our most successful people, projects and programs of 2019 in this issue of Solutions.

It is not a coincidence that I list people first. The quality of our projects and programs is a direct reflection of the innovation and professionalism of our people. As Army Chief of Staff Gen. James C. McConville notes in The Army People Strategy, “We win through our people, and people will drive success in our Readiness, Modernization and Reform priorities. We must take care of our people.”

Our most impressive accomplishments over the past year have been achieved by people from different disciplines and organizations working together toward common goals. For example, Soldiers, scientists, engineers and program managers from multiple organizations came together to design, prototype and demonstrate the upgraded sensor suite of the Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Reconnaissance Vehicle. The new sensor package allows Soldiers to perform threat detection remotely and on the move, greatly improving their margin of safety.

We expanded our communication with Soldiers throughout the year, allowing for person-to-person interactions early in the development process to help us make sure that our modernization efforts are focusing on the right requirements. Efforts like the CBRN Warrior Integration Program (CWIP) and the Warfighter Innovation Leveraging (Mission) Expertise (WILE-E) programs bring Soldiers into the Center to meet and work with our technical experts.

We sent our people in the field in demonstrations and exercises like Perceptive Dragon 3, Joint Warfighter Assessment 2019 and the Chemical Biological Operational Analysis 2019, allowing them to see first-hand how Soldiers use their equipment in the execution of multi-domain operations.

We continued long-standing collaborative programs like Coffee with Colleagues, which brings together hundreds of Center employees from various disciplines to showcase their work and to learn about the contributions their colleagues make to our collective mission. And we celebrated with events like the Gas Mask Dash race and fun run and the dedication of our statue, “Cum Scientia Defendimus– With Science We Defend” in honor of our employees and the Soldiers they serve.


We are committed to ensuring that today’s workforce has access to the educational and training tools needed to maintain the expertise required to protect Soldiers from chemical and biological threats.


The Combat Capabilities Development Command is at the forefront of the Army’s efforts to enhance readiness and lethality, modernize doctrine and equipment, and reform business practices to save money and reinvest in the Army modernization priorities. It’s our people who will drive us to success. As noted in The Army People Strategy, “equipment does not learn, understand, innovate, build cohesive teams, or exercise judgment – people do.”

At the Chemical Biological Center, we are committed to ensuring that today’s workforce has access to the educational and training tools needed to maintain the expertise required to protect Soldiers from chemical and biological threats. We will continue and expand our efforts to create a pipeline of talent focusing on science, technology, engineering and mathematics as well as diversity to help ensure that our next generation workforce is up to the challenge of protecting our Soldiers on tomorrow’s battlefield.

Finally, as we drive into a new year, I invite the entire Center workforce to join me in reaffirming our commitment to the Army Values – Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity and Personal Courage. These values provide our moral compass, an infallible point of reference. They drive our efforts against detractors like sexual harassment and assault, substance abuse, discrimination, domestic and workplace violence, and suicide. When in doubt, we can turn to the Army Values for a powerful affirmation of what is right.

I look forward to a year of challenges, a year of innovation, and a year of victories. I look forward to a year spent with the outstanding people of the CCDC Chemical Biological Center.

“People first — winning matters — Army strong!”
Eric L. Moore, Ph.D.
Director, CCDC Chemical Biological Center

Eric L. Moore, Ph.D., is the director of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC) Chemical Biological Center, the only chemical and biological defense technology center of its kind. He is a member of the Senior Executive Service and is an expert in chemical and biological defense and medical countermeasures.
Prior to his selection as Center director in October 2017, Moore served in various roles at the Defense Threat Reduction Agency including chief of the Advanced and Emerging Threat Division, chief of the Basic and Supporting Sciences Division and senior science and technology manager for chemical medical countermeasures. (Photo by CCDC Chemcial Biological Center)