// NEWS RELEASE

Moore Addresses Role of Technology Transfer in Army Modernization

CCDC Chemical Biological Center Public Affairs | November 21st, 2019

// NEWS RELEASE

Moore Addresses Role of Technology Transfer in Army Modernization

CCDC Chemical Biological Center Public Affairs | November 21st, 2019

// NEWS RELEASE

Moore Addresses Role of Technology Transfer in Army Modernization

CCDC Chemical Biological Center Public Affairs | November 21st, 2019

Moore Addresses Role of Technology Transfer in Army Modernization

CCDC Chemical Biological Center Public Affairs
November 21st, 2019

CCDC Chemical Biological Center Director Eric L. Moore, Ph.D. shares T2 experience at FLC Mid-Atlantic annual meeting.

CCDC Chemical Biological Center Director Eric L. Moore, Ph.D. shares T2 experience at FLC Mid-Atlantic annual meeting.

The U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC) Chemical Biological Center Director, Eric L. Moore, Ph.D., participated as a panelist at the 2019 Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Mid-Atlantic Regional Meeting in Rockville, MD.

Begun in 1974 and officially chartered in 1986, the organization exists to promote and strengthen technology transfer nationwide.

Moderated by John Emond of NASA (retired), the panel focused on the human interest side of federal technology transfer. Panelists presented specific personal examples of how a technology has had an impact on a person’s life or the collective lives of a community.

Moore began his presentation by expressing the importance of technology transfer to the protection of the nation. His comments dovetailed with Emond’s earlier statement listing the advancement of technology through partnership and collaboration as one of the key objectives of technology transfer.

The CCDC Chemical Biological Center leverages a great deal of intellectual capital to develop next generation capabilities. Among capabilities mentioned were the Stryker Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Reconnaissance Vehicle Sensor Suite Upgrade that provides the warfighter with advanced chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear threat sensing tools on the battlefield, as well as threat assessment science that duplicates emerging chemical and biological threats, characterizes them, finds vulnerabilities and ultimately develops detection equipment and decontamination solutions, making this work at the Center a national, one-of-a-kind capability.

Technology transfer was energized and made a priority at the Center, Moore said. The Center redefined the way it worked, bringing Soldiers into the labs to offer researchers immediate feedback on projects. They also extend invitations to industrial and small business partners to observe prototype demonstrations and exercises so they can see in real time the on-the-ground challenges Soldiers and first responders face.

Moore also pointed of that these demonstrations feature emerging technologies and having industry witness these technologies earlier may release them into the production pipeline faster, offering next-generation combat capabilities sooner.

Acknowledging that he could not advance technology transfer alone, Moore applauded his Strategic Initiative Group that oversees technology transfer for the Center.

Moore closed his presentation with an overview of a transferred technology, Solid Decontamination (Decon) Blend, which he said set the standard for transfer timeframe. The entire life cycle of the transfer was a mere six months – going from a Patent License Agreement and Cooperative Research and Development Agreement in early 2019 to commercial sales in June.

Solid Decon Blend neutralizes biological and chemical threats such as nerve agent, opioids and anthrax pathogens.

Moore later accepted an award for FLC Mid Atlantic Laboratory Director of the Year. Our coverage of that story is available here.


The Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC) Chemical Biological Center, formerly known as the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, is the Army’s principal research and development center for chemical and biological defense technology, engineering and field operations. The headquarters of the CCDC Chemical Biological Center is located at the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

For information: Richard Arndt, 410-436-1479